Metrolink seeks to bridge data and business value

Today, data is like crude oil, but it needs to be collected properly and utilized in the right way.

 Displaying data at the Doha Stock Exchange in Qatar, January 2021 (photo credit: REUTERS/IBRAHEEM AL OMARI)
Displaying data at the Doha Stock Exchange in Qatar, January 2021
(photo credit: REUTERS/IBRAHEEM AL OMARI)

Today, data is like crude oil. There’s a sea of it under the surface, but it’s only really useful once it’s lifted up from the abyss, broken down and purposefully refined. 

To do that, we need an effective pipeline. That’s especially true for the era of Big Data, where businesses across the globe pin their hopes on bolstering their operations with greater analytical insights and predictive models, most of which hasn’t exactly been smooth sailing.

The problem is that a good pipeline takes a lot of time to build. Each of its stages – extraction from source, transformation into the needed format, loading into the data warehouse – must work like a well-oiled machine. For that, data engineers have to write, debug and deploy a lot of code, which is a time-consuming task. Things get even trickier when you begin to scale the pipeline up as the data it delivers finally turn into business value.

In all of this, transformation is the most challenging and important part of any modern data infrastructure for ingesting, migrating and warehousing data, which is a necessary precondition for any data science project. In itself, untransformed data is often hardly usable for any business purpose, from processing in business-intelligence tools to machine learning. 

Thus, transformation, which can incorporate a variety of manipulations – from changing data into a different format to removing duplicates and conducting various computations – is not just a crucial component, but also the bridge between data and business value.

 EVEN AFTER THE Cyberserve/Atraf disaster, Bennett is more afraid of overregulation than he is of lacking the power to save the private sector from its own occasional cyber laziness or cheapness. (credit: KACPER PEMPEL/ILLUSTRATION PHOTO/REUTERS) EVEN AFTER THE Cyberserve/Atraf disaster, Bennett is more afraid of overregulation than he is of lacking the power to save the private sector from its own occasional cyber laziness or cheapness. (credit: KACPER PEMPEL/ILLUSTRATION PHOTO/REUTERS)

No one has recognized this more than Metrolink, which is shining a light on the value of streamlined data workflows and robust pipelines, which will prove critical for reinforcing the future of business. Founded by Ronen Korman and Asaf Cohen, two IDF veterans now bringing their hi-tech expertise to civilian industries, Metrolink’s versatile data transformation framework arms data engineers with the building blocks they need to build scalable pipelines of any complexity, for any data types, at-rest, in-motion and together.

Inspired by modular construction, autonomous aviation and infrastructure-as-code solutions, Metrolink allows data engineers to go up the stack and do more data transformation as code and less data transformation through code. This saves data engineering teams’ time and enables them to focus on the larger picture and more complex tasks. It also greatly reduces the data-to-value time as well as the associated costs, allowing data projects to move at the pace of real-world business.

Metrolink uses cutting-edge software to achieve global life-cycle optimization of data infrastructure performance while lowering its costs. Its features include a wide array of ready-made data pipeline building blocks alongside a low-level editor for custom components, native streaming data processing, autonomous scaling and dynamic optimization tools, and robust visibility and debugging support. These capabilities enable it to meet any modern-day data integration demands.

With the advantages of the “as-a-code” framework, Metrolink unlocks true collaboration between data functions, confronting the challenges of data scientists’ productivity and the gaps between business and engineering.

Metrolink’s co-founders bring decades’ worth of data expertise from their military service into the business world. CEO Ronen Korman served as the commander of the elite Unit 81, the R&D division within Israel’s military intelligence, and headed the Cyber Division at the Prime Minister’s Office. CRO Asaf Cohen served as the deputy commander of the elite Unit 8200, the signals-intelligence arm of the Israeli military, where he spearheaded the IDF’s efforts to expand its operational use of artificial intelligence and data. Today, their mission might not be defense-oriented, but their passion for innovation and business savvy with complex data problems is just as rigorous.

Whether in the field of battle or in business, simply collecting data is not enough – you have to put the pieces together, connect all the dots and transform the raw signals into actual value. To do so, you need a fast and versatile infrastructure tailored to your specific needs and tasks. With Metrolink, building one is faster and cheaper, and that’s what ultimately matters for any company looking to become data-driven.