Russia lost more troops in Ukraine than Soviets did in Afghan War - UK Defense Min.

The ministry cited multiple issues as contributing factors to Russia's heavy losses, including "poor, low-level tactics and a command approach which is prepared to reinforce failure."

 Service members of pro-Russian troops drive an armoured vehicle during Ukraine-Russia conflict near the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 17, 2022 (photo credit: REUTERS/ALEXANDER ERMOCHENKO)
Service members of pro-Russian troops drive an armoured vehicle during Ukraine-Russia conflict near the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 17, 2022
(photo credit: REUTERS/ALEXANDER ERMOCHENKO)

Russia has probably lost more troops in its three-month invasion of Ukraine than the Soviet Union did during its nine-year war in Afghanistan, The United Kingdom's Ministry of Defence tweeted on Monday.

According to Lester W. Grau and Ali Ahmad Jalali in “The Soviet-Afghan War: Breaking the Hammer & Sickle,” official Soviet casualties totaled 14,453 in the Soviet-Afghan War.

What are Russia's losses?

In comparison, as of this Monday, the UK government estimated that more than 15,000 Russian soldiers have been killed in the invasion of Ukraine, according to HuffPost, although estimates vary by a significant margin depending on the source.

 Service members of pro-Russian troops walk across a road before the expected departure of Ukrainian soldiers, who surrendered at the besieged Azovstal steel mill, in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict in Mariupol, Ukraine May 19, 2022. (credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters) Service members of pro-Russian troops walk across a road before the expected departure of Ukrainian soldiers, who surrendered at the besieged Azovstal steel mill, in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict in Mariupol, Ukraine May 19, 2022. (credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters)

The Ministry cited multiple issues as contributing factors to Russia's heavy losses, including a “combination of poor, low-level tactics, limited air cover, a lack of flexibility, and a command approach which is prepared to reinforce failure and repeat mistakes.”

The ministry suggested that the Russian public could be receptive to the heavy casualties, causing “public dissatisfaction with the war and a willingness to voice it” to increase.