Ukraine claims 40% of Russian military equipment is not combat-ready

A representative of Ukraine's Defense Ministry claimed that it would take until November for Russia to replace war-weary troops with freshly-trained specialists.

 A LOCAL resident rides a bicycle past a charred armored vehicle in the separatist-controlled town of Volnovakha in the Donetsk region, in March. (photo credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters)
A LOCAL resident rides a bicycle past a charred armored vehicle in the separatist-controlled town of Volnovakha in the Donetsk region, in March.
(photo credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters)

40% of the equipment used by Russian forces in Ukraine is not combat-ready, requiring extensive repairs, Vadym Skibitskyi, a representative of Ukraine's Defense Ministry claimed on Saturday.

"All the latest equipment was in the arsenal of those battalion-tactical groups that entered our territory in February-March," Skibitskyi said. "Now we see that all units being formed are equipped with Soviet-style weapons, which are removed from storage bases and arsenals and given to the troops."

Skibitskyi said that it would take until November for Russia to replace war-weary troops with freshly-trained specialists.

Rushing to resupply

Ukraine has claimed that Russia's armed forces are scrambling to produce new military equipment as the country faces heavy losses in its ongoing invasion of Ukraine.

The Jerusalem Post reported in March that attempts by Russia to replenish troops and material have been hampered by corruption and international sanctions against the country.

 A charred Russian tank and captured tanks are seen, amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in the Sumy region, Ukraine, March 7, 2022. (credit: Irina Rybakova/Press service of the Ukrainian Ground Forces/Handout via REUTERS) A charred Russian tank and captured tanks are seen, amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in the Sumy region, Ukraine, March 7, 2022. (credit: Irina Rybakova/Press service of the Ukrainian Ground Forces/Handout via REUTERS)

Ukraine's Main Intelligence Directorate (GUR) said that based on its assessments, components and electronics had been stolen from Russian vehicles, claiming that many tanks from Russia's 4th Tank Division had been "completely dismantled."

Furthermore, the GUR claimed, Russia has depended upon imported modern military equipment and electronics and sanctions have limited its supply of these items while driving up costs.

Michael Starr contributed to this report.