'Full-flower supermoon' rises as world starts to emerge from lockdowns

The year's two previous supermoons occurred in March and April.

The pink supermoon rises over the Shard skyscraper in an astronomical event that occurs when the Moon is closest to the Earth in its orbit, making it appear much larger and brighter than usual, in London, Britain, April 7, 2020 (photo credit: REUTERS)
The pink supermoon rises over the Shard skyscraper in an astronomical event that occurs when the Moon is closest to the Earth in its orbit, making it appear much larger and brighter than usual, in London, Britain, April 7, 2020
(photo credit: REUTERS)
The last "supermoon" of 2020 rose in the night sky on Thursday over a world beginning to re-emerge after weeks of coronavirus-related lockdowns.
The supermoon phenomenon occurs when the moon is within 10% of its closest distance to the Earth at the full moon. May's full moon - at the height of the Northern Hemisphere spring - is also called a "flower moon" - hence Thursday's "full-flower supermoon."
The year's two previous supermoons occurred in March and April.
Clouds over much of Europe and Asia obscured views of the moon, which appears slightly larger than usual - and the streets remained relatively quiet, with many countries still imposing coronavirus-related restrictions.
But from Hong Kong to Jerusalem to Caracas, some locals donned masks and ventured out to take photos of the celestial spectacle.


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