India to use Israeli technology to disinfect public spaces for COVID-19

The new development disinfects surfaces from 100% of bacteria, viruses, molds and fungi, and remains active for a long time after being sprayed in a manner which is safe for the public.

Volunteers from Basij forces wearing protective suits and face masks spray disinfectant in the streets, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) fears, in Tehran, Iran April 3, 2020 (photo credit: WANA (WEST ASIA NEWS AGENCY)/ALI KHARA VIA REUTERS)
Volunteers from Basij forces wearing protective suits and face masks spray disinfectant in the streets, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) fears, in Tehran, Iran April 3, 2020
(photo credit: WANA (WEST ASIA NEWS AGENCY)/ALI KHARA VIA REUTERS)
An innovative antiseptic disinfectant, which was originally developed for the IDF to deal with biological warfare, has now been recruited to help India in its ongoing fight against the coronavirus pandemic.
The unique technology, developed by the Israel Institute for Biological Research (IIBR) in Ness Ziona and distributed by Israeli company Tera Novel, will be transferred to Indian hands while maintaining a confidentiality agreement as to the unique compound expected to aid in cardinal disinfection of airports, hospitals, the public transport system and more. 
The new development has been found to disinfect surfaces from 100% of bacteria, viruses (including coronavirus), molds and fungi, and remains active for a long time after being sprayed in a manner which is safe for the public.
Distribution in India was made possible thanks to cooperation with Zhiva Innovations Biotech, one of the leading biotech distribution companies in the region, and is expected to help the continent deal with the pandemic that has already infected about half a million citizens in the country and doesn't seem to be slowing down.

Prior to signing the cooperation agreement with India, the technology went through successful trials conducted in 54 mikvahs across Bnei Brak, as well as Menorah Mivtahim Arena, Bloomfield Stadium and other sites. 
The disinfection process was done in collaboration with Tera Novel, which has exclusive marketing rights on a variety of IIBR's products, including WT Steril, which was developed for the military to be used against biological warfare, providing a full disinfection of wet surfaces and places. 
With the advent of the new coronavirus crisis, Tera Novel shifted its aim to finding targeted and innovative solutions to prevent the spread and infection of the virus's in public institutions.
Keren Cohen Hazon, CEO of Tera Novel said that "this is a breakthrough for the environmental war on the coronavirus and, in fact, any other virus or pollutant. The antiseptic allows for maximum protection while fully killing the virus and can be used on vertical and horizontal wet surfaces. These features make it ideal for use anywhere, whether in public places and institutions, tourist sites, sports facilities or for home use."
Hazon congratulated the company's new Indian partners on the new deal, saying "I am confident that the state-of-the-art technology will be able to assist India in the stubborn war against the coronavirus."