Malala Yousafzai, Noble Peace Prize winner, graduates from Oxford U.

Regarding the future, Yousafzai said that "I don’t know what’s ahead. For now, it will be Netflix, reading and sleep."

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan speaks at the World's Children's Prize ceremony in Mariefred, Sweden (photo credit: REUTERS)
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan speaks at the World's Children's Prize ceremony in Mariefred, Sweden
(photo credit: REUTERS)
Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani human rights campaigner, Nobel Prize winner and advocate for female empowerment and education, who was almost killed after being shot in the head in 2012 by a Pakistani Taliban gunmen for her campaigning, graduated from Oxford University on Friday.
In a post on Twitter announcing her graduation, Yousafzai wrote that its "Hard to express my joy and gratitude right now as I completed my Philosophy, Politics and Economics degree at Oxford."
Regarding the future, Yousafzai said that "I don’t know what’s ahead. For now, it will be Netflix, reading and sleep." 
The 22-year-old received a degree in the coveted politics, philosophy, and economics program at Oxford, which she started in October 2017, after she was formally accepted earlier that year at Lady Margaret Hall, where Pakistan’s first female prime minister, Benazir Bhutto (who was assassinated in 2007), studied in the 1970s.
Yousafzai was attacked in Pakistan for promoting female empowerment and education in Pakistan while writing a blog for the BBC's website section on life under the Taliban. Her father also ran the last schools in the Swat Valley in northwest Pakistan that continued to educate girls. 
 
After recovering from her near-fatal injuries, Yousafzai and her family relocated to Birmingham, England, and in 2014, she became the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize, at the age of 17. 
Yousafzai later founded, with her father, the Malala Fund, an NGO devoted to advocating for girls' educational rights in the developing world.
 
 
She tweeted two pictures celebrating her graduation, with one of them showing her covered in confetti and food, an Oxford University tradition known as "trashing."