New York's Museum of Jewish Heritage lauds Supreme Court decision on DACA

The justices on a 5-4 vote upheld lower court rulings that found that Trump's 2017 move to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was unlawful.

A person wearing a shirt with a message takes part in a rally for "Justice Everywhere" to celebrate the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling to disallow the rescinding of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, in San Diego, California, U.S., June 18, 2020. (photo credit: REUTERS)
A person wearing a shirt with a message takes part in a rally for "Justice Everywhere" to celebrate the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling to disallow the rescinding of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, in San Diego, California, U.S., June 18, 2020.
(photo credit: REUTERS)
The Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan, New York lauded the Supreme Court's decision on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).
The US Supreme Court on Thursday dealt President Donald Trump a major setback on his hardline immigration policies, blocking his bid to end a program that protects from deportation hundreds of thousands of immigrants – often called "Dreamers" – who entered the United States illegally as children.
“Today’s Supreme Court decision to uphold the DACA program that has granted safety and opportunity to so many DREAMers is a profound relief to all of moral conscience, the Museum of Jewish Heritage wrote in a statement. "Our Museum, which is located at the southern tip of Manhattan, looks out at the Statue of Liberty, a poignant reminder to honor the humanity of those of whom arrive seeking refuge from poverty, persecution, and violence, and to welcome the stranger."
The executive order signed by former president Barack Obama, gave DACA recipients, known as “Dreamers,” temporary protection that allowed them to obtain driver’s licenses, apply for college loans and work legally.
"Yet those protected by DACA are not even strangers; they are already integrated, productive, caring, and cared about, members of our community. Today, we celebrate their ability to remain so," the Museum of Jewish Heritage continued. "As an institution committed to preserving the lessons of the Holocaust, we have a moral obligation to stand up against the scapegoating of vulnerable, disenfranchised groups. We will not remain quiet when the American-ness of our valued neighbors, classmates, and colleagues is called into question.”
Trump rescinded the order in September 2017 as part of his agenda opposing immigration.
The justices on a 5-4 vote upheld lower court rulings that found that Trump's 2017 move to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was unlawful.
Conservative Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court's four liberals in finding that the administration's actions were "arbitrary and capricious" under a federal law called the Administrative Procedure Act.
The ruling means that the roughly 649,000 immigrants, mostly young Hispanic adults born in Mexico and other Latin American countries, currently enrolled in DACA will remain protected from deportation and eligible to obtain renewable two-year work permits.
Trump's administration has argued that Obama exceeded his constitutional powers when he created DACA by executive action, bypassing Congress.
A collection of states including California and New York, people currently enrolled in DACA and civil rights groups all filed suit to block Trump's plan to end the program. Lower courts in California, New York and the District of Columbia ruled against Trump and left DACA in place, finding that his move to revoke the program violated the Administrative Procedure Act.
Only one justice, Sonia Sotamayor, embraced arguments made by plaintiffs that the policy may have been motivated by discriminatory bias against immigrants. Sotamayor is the court's first Hispanic justice.
Trump has made his crackdown on legal and illegal immigration, including pursuing construction of a wall along the US-Mexican border, a central part of his presidency and his 2020 reelection campaign.

Reuters, Zachary Keyser and Penny Schwartz/JTA contributed to this report.