Rule of thumb in Florida: Stay at least one alligator away from another

The rule of thumb in Leon County is that residents should keep themselves at least one "large alligator" away from their peers during the coronavirus lockdowns, to impede the spread of the disease.

Alligator approached the 18th hole water edge during the third round of the Zurich Classic golf tournament at TPC Louisiana (photo credit: REUTERS)
Alligator approached the 18th hole water edge during the third round of the Zurich Classic golf tournament at TPC Louisiana
(photo credit: REUTERS)
As United States citizens enter into full-fledged lockdowns around the country, government officials in Leon Country, Florida, gave their residents a fitting description on how to measure the proper gap size you should keep between you and your fellow peers in order to practice appropriate social-distancing.
The rule of thumb in Leon County is that residents should keep themselves at least one "large alligator" away from their peers during the coronavirus lockdowns, to impede the spread of the disease.
"This is a reminder that during COVID-19, please remember to keep at least 1 large alligator between you and everyone else at all times," Leon County explained on their Facebook page.

The United States has the world's highest number of known cases of COVID-19, the flu-like respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus. More than 306,000 people have tested positive in the United States and over 8,300 have died, according to a Reuters tally.
Areas of the country such as Florida that had been slow to lock down have started practicing social distancing and sheltering at home this week.
"We see what's going on in New York now, we see that people are dying," Rick Scott, a US senator from Florida, told Fox News Channel.
White House medical experts have forecast that between 100,000 to 240,000 Americans could be killed in the pandemic, even if sweeping orders to stay home are followed.
"We are coming up to a time that is going to be very horrendous," Trump said at the White House. "We probably have never seen anything like these kind of numbers. Maybe during the war, during a World War One or Two or something."
Reuters contributed to this report.