The new US Space Force logo could have been designed by Mr. Spock

The logo was revealed on Friday in a tweet from President Trump.

NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly captured an aurora from the International Space Station in this NASA handout photo taken on June 23, 2015. (photo credit: REUTERS)
NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly captured an aurora from the International Space Station in this NASA handout photo taken on June 23, 2015.
(photo credit: REUTERS)
On Friday, US President Donald Trump revealed the United States Space Force new logo.
The Space Force, the sixth and newest branch of the armed forces, was made official last month when Congress passed a $738 billion military bill. "The launch of an independent US Space Force propels us into a new era dedicated to protecting US national interests and security in space," had then declared the Air Force Secretary.
Just minutes after President Trump's tweet, Twitter users and Star Trek fans from around the world reacted. Many pointed out that the logo looked very similar to the emblem of Star Trek's Starfleet Command, almost as if Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock had been commissioned to design it.
Among the reactions, George Takei's tweet caught everyone's attention. Takei played Liutenant Hiksru Sulu in the original 1960s Star Trek TV series.

In the Washington Post, Takei took the opportunity to mock President Trump and its administration: "At times it truly feels like the past three years have had us beamed into a parallel universe, where instead of a president we have a mendacious thug," he wrote in an op-ed.
Michael Okuda, a longtime Star Trek graphic designer also reacted, but in a more lighthearted way.
“The arrowhead in the US Space Force logo appears to be borrowed from the US Air Force Space Command emblem, which has been in use since the 1980s,” Okuda wrote on Facebook.
“Arrowheads and swooshes and orbits and stars and planets have been used in space emblems long before either of these emblems,” he added. “For whatever it’s worth — and I do not own the intellectual property rights in most of my Star Trek work — I’m not offended by the similarities, nor would I accuse the Space Force of plagiarism. I’m just amused. It ain’t that serious.”