Israeli students to attend school, Teachers' Union strike shut down by Labor Court

Under the new plan, students of all ages in nursery or kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, high school or in the religious education system will take two antigen tests a week.

Teachers' Union representatives following the end of the negotiations with the Finance Ministry (photo credit: TEACHERS UNION'S SPOKESPERSON'S OFFICE)
Teachers' Union representatives following the end of the negotiations with the Finance Ministry
(photo credit: TEACHERS UNION'S SPOKESPERSON'S OFFICE)

The Israeli Labor Court ruled on Thursday morning, after a tense night, to block the decision made by the Secretary-General of Israel Teachers Union Yaffa Ben David to put educational institutions on strike and cancel school on Thursday. A hearing will be held at 2 p.m.

The court explained in its ruling that the announcement was blasted out to the teachers only 11 hours before the beginning of the school day, which is not nearly enough time to hold a proper hearing. 

The decision by the Teachers Union came in light of the new schoolchildren quarantine policy, coming into effect today, by which students who come into contact with corona will be allowed to continue to attend school after performing at-home antigen tests. 

Under the new plan, students of all ages in nursery or kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, high school or in the religious education system will take two antigen tests a week, on Sunday and Wednesday. If they test negative, they will be exempt from isolation even if they come into contact with someone who is sick.

Education Minister Yifat Shasha-Biton called the strike an "aggressive and political step taken on the backs of the children of Israel," the education minister stated, adding that Ben-David's calls to protest are "inappropriate and unacceptable during these trying times."

The labor courts are careful about mask-wearing and social distancing rules. (credit: Courtesy)The labor courts are careful about mask-wearing and social distancing rules. (credit: Courtesy)

Shira Silkoff contributed to this report.