Famed psychoanalyst Carl Jung’s unknown letters to be auctioned in Jerusalem

While most of the letters discussed issues regarding psychiatry, Jung appeared to be intrigued by the Hebrew language and Jewish texts in some of the letters. 

 Photo of Carl Jung. (photo credit: KEDEM AUCTION HOUSE)
Photo of Carl Jung.
(photo credit: KEDEM AUCTION HOUSE)

A unique collection of 62 handwritten and typewritten letters by famed psychoanalyst Carl Gustav Jung that have never been printed or published before are set to be auctioned at the Kedem Auction House in Jerusalem on May 24th. 

Among renowned psychologist Sigmund Freud's finest pupils – Freud regarded him as his natural successor – Carl Gustav Jung is known as the father of analytical psychology and the theorist who gave rise to the concept of "collective unconscious."

The letters were primarily addressed to fellow psychoanalyst Dr. Rivkah Schärf Kluger – who was Jewish. While most of the letters discussed issues regarding psychiatry, Jung appeared to be intrigued by the Hebrew language and Jewish texts in some of the letters.

In a letter dated May 24, 1944, he thanks Schärf Kluger for sending him a particular kabbalistic composition, writing "This (composition) strongly reinforces my own feelings and experiences. I was very impressed by it. In the darkest hours of my illness, every night I found myself in something of a ‘pomegranate orchard’” — Likely a reference to the book by Rabbi Moses ben Jacob Cordovero titled “Pardes Rimonim” (Pomegranate Orchard).

 Previously-unpublished letters by Carl Jung.  (credit: KEDEM AUCTION HOUSE) Previously-unpublished letters by Carl Jung. (credit: KEDEM AUCTION HOUSE)

Jung would also often ask questions pertaining to Jewish culture and language, such as when he asked for an interpretation of the word rikmah (embroidery, tapestry).

“This unique collection sheds light on various aspects of Jung's life and philosophy,” said Meron Eren, Kedem Auction House CEO and co-founder. “This is a true treasure to see such a large collection of unseen letters uncovered and published. A rare occasion for researchers, students, and all who study Jung’s heritage.”