Coronavirus: Which are Israel's best-behaved cities?

Jerusalem - the city with the greatest number of confirmed coronavirus cases - is ranked 58th out of 65 local authorities. Tel Aviv-Jaffa is ranked in 44th place.

An ultra-Orthodox man wearing a mask walks around the neighborhood of Mea Shearim, Jerusalem, April 12, 2020 (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)
An ultra-Orthodox man wearing a mask walks around the neighborhood of Mea Shearim, Jerusalem, April 12, 2020
(photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)
There has been plenty of discussion dedicated to the cities hit hardest by the coronavirus outbreak, but what about the cities that are excelling in terms of their good behavior?
According to a new "national index" published on Monday by the Health Ministry and the Federation of Local Authorities in Israel, residents of Modi'in-Maccabim-Reut, Rosh Ha'ayin and Hod Hasharon lead the way when it comes to adhering to the Health Ministry's strict guidelines.
At the other end of the spectrum, however, residents of Kiryat Shmona reportedly adhere least to the ministry’s guidelines, followed by Bnei Brak and Tzfat.
Jerusalem – the city with the greatest number of confirmed coronavirus cases – is ranked 58th out of 65 local authorities. Tel Aviv-Jaffa is ranked in 44th place.
The index, intended to assist the decision-making processes of policymakers, ranks cities according to the ministry's most fundamental instruction: remaining at home, or within a 100-meter radius.



"Local authorities are the closest bodies to the citizen, and their ability to influence behavior is the greatest of all," said Health Ministry director-general Moshe Bar Siman Tov. "This national index will serve as another tool for local government heads to learn about what is happening in their cities."
On a national level, the index stated, 78% of citizens remained at home or within a permitted distance on Saturday - the highest figure to date. Compared to regular, pre-outbreak levels, the number of car journeys nationwide was just 28.1%. The lowest number of journeys to date was recorded on Thursday, the first day of Passover.
"Thanks to the establishment of the national index, we have the opportunity to measure, evaluate and study the behavior of the population in a life-saving manner," said Haim Bibas, mayor of Modi'in-Maccabim-Reut and chairman of the Federation of Local Authorities in Israel.
"The new index enables authorities to share information and practices, and implement holistic solutions across the country. We do not have time to reinvent the wheel with every problem that arises. The new index enables us to efficiently replicate solutions and thereby save residents' lives."