Israel's vaccine rollout is record-breaking, but is it a surprise?

A new collection of photographs captures Israelis in the early days of the state getting vaccinated.

Provision of vaccines, "Tipat Halav" center, Zoltan Kluger, Israeli, born Hungary 1895-1977. This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print, a gift of Yoram Laymann, Jerusalem.   (photo credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)
Provision of vaccines, "Tipat Halav" center, Zoltan Kluger, Israeli, born Hungary 1895-1977. This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print, a gift of Yoram Laymann, Jerusalem.
(photo credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)
A collection of photographs, recently released by the Israel Museum’s Photographic Estate Department, showcases the early days of the Israeli healthcare system and testifies to the reason why today, Israel was able to roll out the vaccine so quickly.
Hygiene education program in kindergarten, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974 This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)Hygiene education program in kindergarten, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974 This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)
The reason: community-based healthcare, so good it delivered more vaccines per capita than any other country in the world.
To date, the number of Israelis receiving their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine is nearing 3 million, and a little more than half than that have already received their second dose.
Periodic monitoring of children’s growth and development at "Tipat Halav" center, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974. This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)Periodic monitoring of children’s growth and development at "Tipat Halav" center, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974. This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)
There are photos of pregnant women and young mothers getting medical care at Tipat Halav.
Provision of vaccines, "Tipat Halav" center, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974. This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)Provision of vaccines, "Tipat Halav" center, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974. This is a 1950s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)
There are also photos of citizens getting vaccinated at health funds.
New immigrants come for examination at the clinic, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974. This is a 1960s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)New immigrants come for examination at the clinic, Alfred Bernheim, Israeli, born Germany, 1885-1974. This is a 1960s Gelatin silver print from The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Alfred Bernheim Collection, acquired through the generosity of Warner Communications, New York. (Credit: ISRAEL MUSEUM’S PHOTOGRAPHIC ESTATE DEPARTMENT)
Israel is a world leader with its rapid vaccine rollout, though the data also comes during a nationwide lockdown that has been helping to stem contagion. Israelis began receiving first shots of Pfizer's vaccine on December 19.
The campaign is so successful it had an effect on investors, who are treading into Israeli markets, prompted by the idea of a vaccine-enabled economic recovery.
Reuters contributed to this report.