Osem to scout for packaging solutions under $2.1b. Nestlé plan

In September 2019, Nestlé announced its ambition to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, signing the United Nation's "Business Ambition for 1.5°C" pledge.

Packets of Bamba are seen at Osem's Kiryat Gat manufacturing plant  (photo credit: OSEM)
Packets of Bamba are seen at Osem's Kiryat Gat manufacturing plant
(photo credit: OSEM)
Israeli food manufacturer Osem Group will assist parent company Nestlé to scout for technologies after the Swiss corporation announced plans on Thursday to invest up to CHF 2 billion ($2.1b.) in developing sustainable packaging solutions.
Nestlé, the world's largest food company, unveiled plans in 2018 to make all its packaging recyclable or reusable by 2025. The corporation aims to use the investment to "lead the shift from virgin plastics to food-grade recycled plastics" and reduce its use of virgin plastics by one-third within five years.
"Food quality and safety are paramount, and packaging plays a major role in assuring this," the company said in a statement. Between now and 2025, Nestlé has now committed to sourcing up to two million metric tons of food-grade recycled plastics, allocating more than CHF 1.5b. ($1.56b.) to pay a premium for the materials.
In September 2019, Nestlé announced its ambition to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, signing the United Nation's "Business Ambition for 1.5°C" pledge.
In addition to in-house research, carried out by the Nestlé Institute of Packaging Sciences, the food and drink giant will launch a CHF 250m. ($260m.) venture fund to invest in start-ups developing sustainable packaging.
"Within the framework of efforts to identify and invest in innovative packaging solutions, Osem and Nestlé will review interesting technologies developed in Israel, both by start-ups and by other research bodies," said Osem-Nestlé CEO Avi Ben Assayag. "Osem also works according to the spirit of Nestlé's global vision and has set ambitious goals for environmental protection and reduced environmental impact."
As of this year, Ben Assayag said, 67% of the company's packaging will be fully recyclable, and by 2025 all of its packaging will be made from recyclable materials. Osem also plans to discontinue the use of all disposable products at its facilities by June 2020.
"No plastic should end up in landfill or as litter," said Nestle CEO Mark Schneider.
“Making recycled plastics safe for food is an enormous challenge for our industry. That is why in addition to minimizing plastics use and collecting waste, we want to close the loop and make more plastics infinitely recyclable," Schneider said.
"We are taking bold steps to create a wider market for food-grade recycled plastics and boost innovation in the packaging industry. We welcome others to join us on this journey."


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