Rivlin in Germany: We're grateful for German commitment to our safety

President Reuven Rivlin met Jewish and non-Jewish school children, as well as German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer.

President Reuven Rivlin meeting German Defense Mininister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer (photo credit: AMOS BEN-GERSHOM/GPO)
President Reuven Rivlin meeting German Defense Mininister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer
(photo credit: AMOS BEN-GERSHOM/GPO)
President Reuven Rivlin began his state visit in Germany on Tuesday with a meeting with German President Frank-Walter
Steinmeier and speaking with students at the Berlin Moses Mendelssohn School, a Jewish school in Berlin, a press release on behalf of his office reported.
 
When Steinmeier asked the students if their Jewishness was an issue in other schools, a non-Jewish girl told him that in her previous school, she was told that she wouldn't exist if Adolf Hitler was still alive because she’s black.
The girl said that she is proud to learn in a Jewish school, where she feels she belongs.
Both presidents shared with the students how vital it is to use education as a tool to fight the never ending war against antisemitism and racism.
Rivlin then met with German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, and the two of them met German and Israeli soldiers who trained together in Israel. Rivlin thanked her for the support Germany offers Israel and the two met with German and Israeli soldiers who trained jointly in Israel.
Rivlin thanked her for the support Germany offers Israel.
“We are grateful for the German commitment to Israel’s safety,” he said, and mentioned that German air-force pilots train in Israel and Israeli paratroopers collaborate with their German colleagues. “Such joint training is important to ensure we are ready to deal with threats now and in the future,” Rivlin said.
Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) was the founder of the Haskalah movement and was a major figure in the Jewish enlightenment period. In addition, he also translated the Torah to German alongside his own commentary and released the first Modern Hebrew magazine Kehilat Mosar.