This week in Jerusalem - A round-up of city affairs

What has been going on in Israel's capital this week?

BEITAR JERUSALEM players celebrate with Eliran Atar (center) after the forward scored on a 26th-minute penalty in his first match with the club to help the yellow-and-black beat Maccabi Haifa 2-0 last night in Israel Premier League action at Teddy Stadium (photo credit: BERNEY ARDOV)
BEITAR JERUSALEM players celebrate with Eliran Atar (center) after the forward scored on a 26th-minute penalty in his first match with the club to help the yellow-and-black beat Maccabi Haifa 2-0 last night in Israel Premier League action at Teddy Stadium
(photo credit: BERNEY ARDOV)
Seven-dunam case

City councilman Adv. Yossi Havilio may have found the best answer to stop a private construction project on Zangwill Street in Kiryat HaYovel. Havilio, formerly the municipal legal adviser, sent an urgent letter to Mayor Moshe Lion, reminding him of a legal clause stating that no private project can be erected on a plot of more than seven dunams, if intended for public use. The new project in question, which includes 500 housing units, is to be constructed on the site of the Taylor community center and the swimming pool at the location, is for public use. It is unclear if this complication will prevent the Shikun and Binui infrastructure company, the plot's owners from going ahead; it is certain the company will face a legal challenge.
Soccer and peace

Rumor has become fact. On Tuesday, it was announced that the UAE's Sheikh Ibn Khalifa had acquired a 50% stake in the Beitar Jerusalem soccer team, making him a co-owner of the leading club, whose fans have at times have been known for hostility toward Arabs – particularly the La Familia group, who announced their intention to protest the purchase. However, Ibn Khalifa says he is not afraid and intends to show that Jews and Arabs can peacefully coexist.
No towers here

Four-hundred objections have already been submitted to the local planning committee against a French Hill project that includes the construction of a 24-story tower. Residents, filing complaints through local leadership offices, say they were not consulted and that the project would ruin their Old City views. Additional objections are expected to be filed before the planning committee hears and reviews the complaints.