Elderly monitoring system installed in Israel's hospitals, amid pandemic

“As elderly people become more isolated as a result of social distancing, there is an increased need to monitor them without the burden of wearables or privacy-invading cameras.”

A security guard checks the temperature of passengers at the entrance to the central bus station in Jerusalem, on April 20, 2020. (photo credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90)
A security guard checks the temperature of passengers at the entrance to the central bus station in Jerusalem, on April 20, 2020.
(photo credit: OLIVIER FITOUSSI/FLASH90)
A non-invasive, radar-based system is being installed in Israeli hospitals and care centers as the the need to monitor vulnerable elderly patients from afar has grown during the COVID-19 pandemic.
The remote senior care monitoring, which has been internationally trialed, comes from an Israel-based start-up company called EchoCare Technologies, according to the Calcalist.
The company started manufacturing its a non-wearable home care system based on radar technology for elderly people due to a rise in demand, as healthcare systems become overwhelmed, social distancing and various lockdown measures were put in place and general health threats increased.
"COVID-19 has emphasized the need for solutions like the ECHO system,” EchoChare CEO, co-founder and vice president of R&D Rafi Zack said in a statement.
“As elderly people become more isolated as a result of social distancing, there is an increased need to monitor them without the burden of wearables or privacy-invading cameras.”
The radar technology automatically detects and alerts users of emergency or abnormal behaviors. 
Adapting to life during the pandemic, Israel's healthcare system has begun installing the device in COVID-19 departments in hospitals with internal medicine departments to help monitor respiratory distress among older patients, according to the Calcalist
The device can be hung from the ceiling so as to not interfere or intrude on any additional respiratory assistance tools if required.
However, before the device was installed in Israel hospital, it was trialed in both Japan in Australia. EchoCare was used with Japanese electronics manufacturer SMK Corporation and Australian aged care provider Lifeview, the Calcalist reported. Both trials were successful in monitoring a user's status in situations such as personal care time, sleeping time and breathing ability.