Bringg partners with Uber to provide 'Amazon-like' delivery speed

"The back-end of retail success is a matter of two things: Setting up the technology to properly orchestrate your fulfillment network, and the fulfillment network itself.

Bringg CEO Guy Bloch (photo credit: Courtesy)
Bringg CEO Guy Bloch
(photo credit: Courtesy)
“Amazon set the standard of offering super-fast delivery everywhere,” said Bringg CEO Guy Bloch. “We want to offer that level of service to any brand.”
Tel Aviv-based Bringg provides a unified delivery logistics solution that handles all aspects of product delivery, including the entire management of delivery fleets.
The company, whose clients include such companies as Walmart, McDonald’s and Coke, recently signed a very significant deal with global ride-sharing giant Uber. This will give Bringg’s customers seamless access to drivers through Uber Direct, which enables them to provide same-day and next-day delivery, the company said.
“This is a very significant partnership for us to scale,” Bloch said. “It expands our ability to deliver last-mile service, so that if drivers are unavailable during peak delivery times, we can outsource service to a third-party easily. Now, we will be able to offer business-critical 30-minute or one-hour delivery almost everywhere.”
This partnership is a win-win for both sides. Uber has the need to keep its drivers happy with enough work so they stay on the platform, and we’ll give them more delivery gigs at off-hours throughout the day. From our side, seamless access to a nearly unlimited pool of drivers will allow us to scale our services dramatically. And, as Uber continues to expand into other countries, we’ll go wherever they go.”
“We know how to do this for all segments – retail, restaurants, automotive,” Bloch said. “If you are at your auto mechanic, and he needs a very specific part, we have the delivery time for that part down to the amount of time it takes to order a pizza.”
“We want to give every brand the ability to offer the same level of service as Amazon,” Bloch said. “In this market, if you can’t provide that level of service, it’s disastrous for your company.
“COVID pushed retail businesses to go online, but running a store online is a totally different ballgame than managing a physical store,” said Bloch. “It is no longer about your location or your service staff. What matters is how convenient and cost-effective your model is.
“The back-end of retail success is a matter of two things: setting up the technology to properly orchestrate your fulfillment network, and the fulfillment network itself, which means actually getting the product to users. For most businesses, this is not their forte, and that’s where we come in.”
The coronavirus pandemic was a time of rapid growth for Bringg.
“Our customers saw volume grow significantly when the pandemic began, as online sales shot up,” Bloch said. “All of a sudden the growth we expected over several years happened in 10 weeks. We have now moved our business to a new phase, where we have shifted the company’s mindset toward scaling up to be a major player. We hired 72 new people last year, and plan to hire another 150 this year. We are hiring top people who know how to lead this type of change.”
To finance this, the company raised $30 million in series D funding in April.
At the same time, Bloch said, he is focused on building a company culture that is centered around a community.
“We don’t just operate behind the scenes, we are also among the customers shopping online. We wanted to make our product available to everyone, so during the first few weeks of the pandemic, we released a free version of our solution called BringgNow to help small businesses immediately launch and scale delivery operations.
“If we work together as a community, we can make an impact and solve the issues that we collectively face,” Bloch said at the product launch. “Now more than ever, both businesses and people need to focus on supporting one another in order to succeed together.”