CASTLES IN the Air.  (photo credit: Jerusalem Artists House)
CASTLES IN the Air. (photo credit: Jerusalem Artists House)
Jerusalem highlights September 16-22
 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 

Visit “My Beloved Jerusalem,” an exhibition of paintings by Yoram Zamosh, which opened three days ago at Friends of Zion Museum, 20 Yosef Rivlin St. Open from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The 16 works featured focus on the capital and are a labor of love by Zamosh, who began painting at the age of 77, following the loss of his grandson. 

Curated by Gershon Hayman, the works offer a sensitive exploration of the complexity of the city. Zamosh served as a paratrooper during the Six Day War and participated in the battle that reunited the two parts of Jerusalem. Admission is free, but preregistration is required. Call (02) 532-9401.


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 

Visit “Castled in the Air,” the new virtual exhibition at Jerusalem Artists’ House. The exhibition includes works by Nivi Alroy, Tal Boniel, Carmi Dror, Karen Russo, Miri Segal and Dor Zlekha Levy. It will be available via Jerusalem Artists’ House website from Tuesday, September 13, at www.art.org.il.

Curators Smadar Tsook and Ofer Getz oversaw the scanning of the Artists’ House into digital space, then invited the artists to begin a dialogue with the old site, now transformed to cyberspace. Available via smartphones, the exhibition marks the opening of a new technological wing at the Artists’ House tackling our complex hybrid age, where the real and digital are often blurred.

THE MONTEFIORE Windmill, today the official tasting room of Jerusalem Vineyard Winery (credit: Courtesy)THE MONTEFIORE Windmill, today the official tasting room of Jerusalem Vineyard Winery (credit: Courtesy)

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 

Visit Jerusalem Vineyard Winery and sample six of their wines during the 50-minute Jerusalem Glimpse workshop (NIS 70 per person). With its visitor’s center at the Montefiore Windmill (4 Yemin Moshe St.), this is a great idea for anyone looking for a romantic evening near summer’s end. Opening hours are 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Call (02) 664-6062 for more information.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 

Watch the 1957 film Elevator to the Gallows by Louis Malle at 6 p.m. as part of the Jerusalem Cinematheque’s “The Sound of Cinema” series. The music for this black-and-white masterpiece, with actress Jeanne Moreau, was created by jazz musician Miles Davis. The improvised music that this jazz legend created for the film became the basis for Kind of Blue, one of the best-known albums in jazz history. The film is in French with Hebrew subtitles. 


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 

Listen to new music by trumpet player Yuval Pedaya taken from his first and just-released album Mountains Breeze. Join a musical ride composed by a cancer survivor that fuses jazz, Jewish music, and Arabic music. The 9 p.m. concert at the Yellow Submarine (13 Harechavim St., NIS 55 per ticket) is a sitting concert. Doors open at 8 p.m. Call (02) 679-4040 to book.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 

Watch the play Magshimim High at 8:30 p.m. (Mezia Home for Theater, 18 Mesilat Yesharim St.). The award-winning, Hebrew-language rap-musical-comedy is focused on the life of a teenager from Nes Tziona forced to adapt to the new, bizarre, rules of his new school.

This Incubator production by chief writer and theater director Amit Olman is in step with another rap-musical-comedy, Shmuel, directed by Mulli Shulman and written by Tomer Abraham. In this story, a young Israeli man commits suicide and ends up in hell. There, a very comical Adolf Hitler aids him to challenge Satan himself to a rap battle. NIS 85 per ticket via (02) 654-3001 for Magshimim High. Call Temuna Theater, Tel Aviv, to ask when will Shmuel perform again at (03) 561-1211. The Monday, October 17, 9 p.m. performance of Shmuel is currently sold out. 


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 

Attend “Temple of the Eye” by Gon Ben Ari and Oren Fischer as part of the series of the Israel Festival art events. The performance is based on the fantastical suggestion that during the mid-1970s, a temple of the eye operated in the South. It is allegedly devoted to Moshe Dayan’s missing eye. 

The idea is that Dayan purchased the site to close its doors, but perhaps, the artists suggest, the old war veteran decided to use the site for spiritual work. This blend of Israeli mythology and occult practices event will be highly rewarding – for those initiated. Performance at 9:30 p.m. at the Jerusalem Theatre (20 Marcus St.), NIS 135 per ticket. Call *9066 to book.

Throwing a good party? Opening an art exhibition or a new bar? Bringing in a guest speaker to introduce a fascinating topic? Drop me a line at [email protected] and let In Jerusalem know about it. Send emails with “Jerusalem Highlights” in the subject line. While all information is welcome, we cannot guarantee it will be featured in the column.



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