70 years of conflict later

By CHARLES BYBELEZER/THE MEDIA LINE
November 29, 2017 19:02

While territorial division remains the focus of the peace process, some believe that the core issue of the conflict is a rejection of any Jewish sovereignty




DAVID BEN-GURION reads the declaration of Israel’s independence in Tel Aviv in 1948.

DAVID BEN-GURION reads the declaration of Israel’s independence in Tel Aviv in 1948. (photo credit: KLUGER ZOLTAN/GPO)

Considered by many as being arguably the most significant day in modern Jewish history, November 29, 1947 signals the first time in 2,000 years that the international community moved to actualize the national aspirations of the wounded, albeit unbroken, Jewish people.

The United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine, outlined in Resolution 181 and adopted by the General Assembly, recommended the division of British Mandatory Palestine into two states: one Jewish and one Arab. Despite reservations – primarily that a non-contiguous and vulnerable Israel would be created on less than 20% of the territory originally envisioned by the 1918 Balfour Declaration – the Jewish pre-state leadership accepted the plan. By contrast, Arab governments unanimously rejected it, effectively charting the course for seven decades of conflict.

Read More...

Related Content