Whole lotta dance in Jerusalem

The Lev Ha'ir Community Center in Jerusalem and its Mahol Shalem group present African and local companies in their fourth Whole Dance Festival.

By HELEN KAYE
November 17, 2008 12:52

 
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The Lev Ha'ir Community Center in Jerusalem and its Mahol Shalem (Whole Dance) group present African and local companies in their fourth Whole Dance Festival, which will take place at Beit Shmuel and in the newly renovated Havazelet Passage from November 19 through 21. Let's start with closing event: There will be a huge free happening to inaugurate the Passage on November 21 with dance from Michel Kaoako of the Ivory Coast, plus storytelling, live music and more. As to the rest of the festival, Inzilo from South Africa and Vahinla from Madagascar together present Karonano, a meeting of African cultures; Palm Tree from Ghana is both giving a workshop and presenting an evening of drumming, song and dance ranging in subject from tribal ritual to war. Local choreographers include Robbi Adelman with Instinctive Dog - only part of the long title for the work, in collaboration with the Jerusalem Science Museum - that deals with how we perceive, and Nimrod Fried will offer Flies and their intrusive effect on our lives.

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