A performance pleasure delights audiences

An element of social consciousness has been present in most of the Vertigo Dance Company's works over the past 14 years and Sunny Side Up, the troupe's latest production, is no exception.

By ORA BRAFMAN
January 14, 2007 10:27
1 minute read.
vertigo dance 88

vertigo dance 88 . (photo credit: )

Vertigo Dance Company Sunny Side Up Suzanne Dellal Center An element of social consciousness has been present in most of the Vertigo Dance Company's works over the past 14 years, and Sunny Side Up, the troupe's latest production, is no exception, though it may initially appear little more than a carefree dance piece. Vertigo, a Jerusalem-based contemporary dance company founded by Adi Sha'al and Noa Wertheimer, has always been open to collaborating with guests, and Sunny Side Up includes the work of the promising young Spanish choreographer Roberto Olivan. Olivan's approach to dance is tailor-made for Vertigo, combining plenty of energy, fluidity of movement and naturalistic expression. All six members of the Sunny Side Up ensemble seemed at ease throughout the piece. But while watching them jump, roll, skip and fall into daring lifts was a pleasure, the real delight of the piece was sensing how the dancers genuinely enjoyed the movement and energy of the performance. Sunny Side Up saw them move from a serious, dynamic dance encounter into a singing quartet that managed to perform a rather juvenile song with charm - the dancers were just having too much fun for the audience not to enjoy the make-shift music. The unexpected singing meshed well with the work's unpretentiousness and simple - but certainly not simplistic - human messages. The dancers completely won me over in Sunny Side Up's final scene, with each performer displaying a series of family photos on a white stand. The piece's lovely, lively message came through to the audience loud and clear.


Related Content

Sarah Silverman
August 26, 2014
Jewish women take home gold at 2014 Emmys

By JTA