Dance Review: "Come, Feel"

Slowly but surely dancer/choreographer Sahar Azimi has turned into a mature dance-maker who projects his own unique, personal voice with growing assurance.

By ORA BRAFMAN
June 4, 2007 10:36
1 minute read.

 
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Sahar Azimi "Come, Feel" Tmuna Theater May 26 Slowly but surely dancer/choreographer Sahar Azimi has turned into a mature dance-maker who projects his own unique, personal voice with growing assurance. His latest full evening work "Come, Feel" for four dancers and a musician sprung from his earlier male duet "Iron Horses," danced by Tzuf Yizhaki and Azimi himself. The two strong female dancers who join in are Maya Wiezer, a former Batsheva dancer, and Shir Hacham. They provide a true match for the male pair. Together they form an impressive foursome unit with one of the more intense dance pieces of the season. Through a collaborative work process, Azimi and his dancers investigate movement in a way that leaves room for individual bodily manifestation, which leads to an innovative movement lexicon. At times, all four explore their emotional limitations and their physical boundaries, and seem to stretch their corporal explorations to the limit, without frills and without softening the edges; bodies clash with thuds, jumps turn to thumping falls and their intense expressions ignite the room. Structurally, the work is constructed as an assemblage of interwoven encounters of male and female dancers, laced with solo sections, all tied loosely by the sensitive musical collage performed by Didi Erez. His artistic choices enhance the severe, honest and touching work.

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