News of the Muse

In "Hayuta" - a new work inspired by the work of Hanoch Levin, a musical "collage" of the Israeli playwright's poems and other writings will be set to music and performed in a variety of theatrical styles.

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
December 6, 2005 09:31
2 minute read.
hayuta 88 298

hayuta 88 298. (photo credit: )

 
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Jacob Pins remembered The dean of Israeli woodcut artists and noted collector of Japanese prints, Jacob Pins, has died in Jerusalem aged 88. One of the last of Jerusalem's famous yekkes, Pins was born in Germany in 1917 and arrived here on a student visa in 1936. His parents were killed in the Holocaust. Pins studied under Jacob Steinhardt and replaced him as teacher of woodcut at the Bezalel School. The author of the only book on Japanese "pillar" prints, Pins willed his huge collection of Far Eastern art to the Israel Museum. - Meir Ronnen Putting Levin to music It was only a matter of time before the ever inventive composer Roni Porat teamed up with such talents as Arye Zonnenshein on piano, Daniel Feingold on percussion and Ido Bukelman on guitar. In "Hayuta" - a new work inspired by the writings of the late playwright Hanoch Levin, a musical "collage" of the Israeli playwright's poems and other writings will be set to music and performed in a variety of theatrical styles. Porat, playing bass, has set Levin's lyrics to music and allied them to his texts, such as "Turk, Turk, Who Dreamed You Tonight?", "The Chinese Chief of Staff", "Gigolo from the Congo", and the title text "Hayuta Sees a Mammoth". Also on stage are Yarden Bar-Cochva and Emmanuel Hanun. "Hayuta" will premiere at the Holon Theater on Saturday evening, December 10. - Helen Kaye and Nathan Burstein

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