Three-pointers, homeruns, goals all bring a crowd to their feet because inspiration finds a natural home at sporting events. Athleticism stretches the bounds of the ordinary to become extraordinary and it’s in those moments when humans can seem to attain Olympian status.


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But even before the Olympics start-up in Rio this summer, there was the NBA Playoffs and Finals on TV where I was reminded of that same youthful era (including kadoor sahl at summer camp.) And while the players’ names have changed, the legends that indelibly marked the 70s, 80s and 90s on the court still surface in my memory.



Today that feeling was transferred onto the current court with the matchup between LeBron James, whose physical presence can dominate offensively and Stephen Curry, who maneuvers the ball and shoots like one of the all-time greats – he’s poetry in motion.

Getting a company’s brand to attain that level of inspiration may seem like, well, an Olympian effort. But like a great athlete, a brand needs to have a dream, and then it needs practice – lots of work and practice – to get it into shape. It has to have the drive to be the best and with focus, it can soar.

Here’s a great example of just that kind of commercial that ran during the winter Olympics from P&G.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ult4t-1NoQ

As you can see, ultimately, to get it to that higher place, it can’t only reach the head of its consumers, it also has to hit their hearts and it can do that with words (though notice this spot barely has any), rather it’s in the music and imagery.  Likewise, right after the NBA Finals, Nike aired a spot, “Worth The Wait” as a tribute to the city of Cleveland (both commercials were created by Weiden & Kennedy) and both hit me the same way with emotion and a hope that anything is possible. .

 
Abe Novick is a writer and communications consultant and can be reached at abe@abebuzz.com.

 

 

 

 


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