Facebook tests end-to-end encryption on Messenger

By REUTERS
July 9, 2016 02:22

 
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Facebook Inc on Friday said it began testing end-to-end encryption on its popular Messenger application to prevent snooping on digital conversations.

The limited testing on Messenger, which has more than 900 million users, comes three months after Facebook rolled out end-to-end encryption to its more popular WhatsApp, a messaging application with over 1 billion users that it acquired in October 2014.

The move comes amid widespread global debate over the extent to which technology companies should help law enforcement snoop on digital communications.

End-to-end encryption is also offered on Apple Inc's iMessage platform as well as apps including LINE, Signal, Viber, Telegram and Wickr.



Facebook Messenger uses the same encryption technology as WhatsApp, which uses a protocol known as Signal that was developed by privately held Open Whisper Systems.

"It seems well designed," said Matthew Green, a Johns Hopkins University cryptologist who helped review an early version of the protocol for Facebook.

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