Iran nuclear deal would boost cooperation, Rouhani says

By REUTERS
September 23, 2014 22:41

 
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If Iran and world powers reach a long-term nuclear deal that ends sanctions against Tehran, the agreement will open the door to deeper cooperation on regional peace and stability and the fight against terrorism, Iran's president said on Tuesday.

President Hassan Rouhani, who spoke to senior editors ahead of the annual gathering of world leaders at the UN General Assembly, said he had no plans to meet US President Barack Obama while in New York City.

"Without a doubt, reaching a final nuclear deal will expand our cooperation, and we can cooperate in various fields including restoring regional peace and stability and fighting against terrorism," he said through an interpreter.

Senior foreign ministry officials from the United States, Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and Iran are meeting this week in New York. Officials close to the talks say a deal is unlikely in coming days given deep disagreement on issues such as the scope of Iran's future enrichment program.

The sides have set a Nov. 24 deadline for a long-term agreement that would end sanctions on Tehran in exchange for curbs on its nuclear program.

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