Iran sentences 'Mossad agent' to death over scientist killings

Was Israel really behind the death of Iranian scientists?

By REUTERS
October 24, 2017 18:42
2 minute read.

Iran hangs 'Mossad agent' Majid Jamali Fashi for scientist killing scientist Massoud Ali-Mohammadi, May 16, 2012. (Reuters)

Iran hangs 'Mossad agent' Majid Jamali Fashi for scientist killing scientist Massoud Ali-Mohammadi, May 16, 2012. (Reuters)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Iran has sentenced to death a person found guilty of providing information to Israel to help it assassinate several senior nuclear scientists, Tehran's prosecutor said on Tuesday.

At least four scientists were killed between 2010 and 2012 in what Tehran said was a program of assassinations aimed at sabotaging its nuclear program. Iran hanged one man in 2012 over the killings, saying he had links to Israel.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


On the latest conviction, Tehran prosecutor Abbas Jafari Dolatabadi told the judiciary's news agency: "The person had several meetings with (Israeli intelligence agency) Mossad and provided them with sensitive information about Iran's military and nuclear sites in return for money and residency in Sweden."

The headline of the report described the convicted person as a "Mossad agent."

Dolatabadi did not identify the person, but Amnesty International said on Monday that Ahmadreza Djalali, an Iranian doctor who studied and taught in Sweden, had been sentenced to death in Iran on espionage charges.

Amnesty said the court verdict states that Djalali worked with the Israeli government which subsequently helped him obtain a residency permit in Sweden.

Neither Iran nor Amnesty said when the verdict was issued.

Djalali was arrested in April 2016 and held without access to a lawyer for seven months, three of which were in solitary confinement, Amnesty said.

"Djalali was sentenced to death after a grossly unfair trial that once again exposes not only the Iranian authorities' steadfast commitment to (the) use of the death penalty but their utter contempt for the rule of law," said Philip Luther, Amnesty’s Middle East advocacy director.

The United States has denied Iran's accusation that it was involved in the scientists' deaths, and Israel has a policy of not commenting on such allegations.

Dolatabadi said the convicted person gave Mossad information about 30 nuclear and military scientists including Massoud Ali-Mohammadi who was killed by a remote-controlled bomb attached to a motorcycle outside his home in Tehran.

An undated image released by Iran's Fars News Agency of Tehran University professor Massoud Ali-Mohammadi who was killed by a bomb in front of his home in north Tehran January 12, 2010.

The judiciary said he was also linked to the assassination of nuclear engineer Majid Shahriari, killed in a bomb attack in November 2010.

Djalali’s wife Vida Mehrannia, who lives in Sweden with their two children, has told Amnesty International that his physical and mental health have sharply deteriorated since he was detained.

"We are calling for his release because he has not committed any crime," Amnesty quoted her as saying.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Visitors read books at the Big Bad Wolf Book Sale, which calls itself the world's biggest
October 18, 2018
'World's largest book sale' opens shop in Dubai

By REUTERS