Poland votes, conservative eurosceptic party looks set to win

By REUTERS
October 25, 2015 03:27
1 minute read.

 
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WARSAW - Poles vote in an election on Sunday that could end nearly a decade of economic and political stability in the country of 38 million, bringing to power a conservative, eurosceptic party whose policies diverge from many of Poland's European allies.

If opinion polls are correct, the ruling Civic Platform (PO), a pro-market, centrist grouping in power for the past eight years, will lose to the conservative Law and Justice opposition party (PiS), run by the twin brother of late president Lech Kaczynski, Jaroslaw.

Most polls show PiS as the frontrunner on more than 30 percent, while PO is second with just over 20 percent. Several small parties are also running, spanning the political spectrum from ultra-right to liberal and extreme left.

Distrustful of the European Union and an advocate of a strong NATO hand in dealing with Moscow, PiS opposes joining the 'euro zone' in the near future, promises more welfare spending on the poor and wants banks subject to new taxation.

It also opposes the relocation of migrants from the Middle East to Poland, arguing they could threaten Poland's Catholic way of life - raising the prospect of tensions with the EU on the issue.

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