UK PM Cameron says no reparations for slave trade, BBC reports

By REUTERS
October 1, 2015 04:21
1 minute read.

 
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British Prime Minister David Cameron said his administration would not make reparations for the country's role in the Caribbean slave trade, the BBC reported on Wednesday.

Cameron made the remarks during his visit to Jamaica, the first for a British prime minister in 14 years, according to the BBC.

"I do hope that, as friends who have gone through so much together since those darkest of times, we can move on from this painful legacy and continue to build for the future," Cameron told Jamaica's parliament, according to the BBC.

Caribbean leaders in 2014 approved a 10-point plan to seek reparations from the former slave-owning states of Europe. The Caribbean countries said European governments in addition to being responsible for conducting slavery and genocide, also imposed 100 years of racial apartheid and suffering on freed slaves and the survivors of genocide.

Slavery ended throughout the Caribbean in the 1800s in the wake of slave revolts, and left many of the region's plantation economies in tatters. Caribbean leaders have said that the region continues to suffer from the effects of slavery today.

The BBC reported Jamaican Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller said she had broached the issue of reparations with Cameron.

Governments in the Caribbean have estimated that reparations for the slave trade could cost trillions of dollars and some have floated the idea of debt relief, the BBC reported.

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