US seeks Iran's help in finding missing American

By REUTERS
November 26, 2013 20:55
1 minute read.

 
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WASHINGTON - The United States on Tuesday asked Iran for help in finding an American who has been missing there for more than six years, in a hint of the potential for a thaw between the two adversaries after a landmark deal on Tehran's nuclear program.

The White House called for Iran to cooperate in locating retired Federal Bureau of Investigation agent Robert Levinson, who disappeared during a business trip to Iran in March 2007.

"We welcome the assistance of our international partners in this investigation, and we respectfully ask the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran to assist us in securing Mr. Levinson's health, welfare, and safe return," the White House said in a statement.

The request comes days after world powers reached a deal with Iran to curb that nation's nuclear program in exchange for the easing some of the crippling sanctions that the global community has imposed on Teheran. The Obama administration pushed for the deal as a first step aimed at buying time to negotiate a comprehensive agreement.

The United States and other countries had long feared Iran was on course to develop a nuclear weapon, and although Iran maintained its efforts were strictly peaceful, it resisted international controls, which led to sanctions.

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