Watch: Hundreds of jellyfish threaten to clog up Israeli power plant

Are jellyfish a threat to Israeli power stations?

By REUTERS
June 27, 2017 17:15

SCORES OF JELLYFISH AT POWER PLANT FILTERS AND FACILITIES, FORKLIFTS CARRYING CONTAINERS FULL OF JELLYFISH

SCORES OF JELLYFISH AT POWER PLANT FILTERS AND FACILITIES, FORKLIFTS CARRYING CONTAINERS FULL OF JELLYFISH

 
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Swarms of jelly fish washed up from the Mediterranean Sea threatened to clog one of Israel's main power stations on Tuesday during hot summer days, its chief engineer told Reuters.

Located north of Tel Aviv and near the coastal Israeli town of Hadera, the coal-fired power station, "Orot Rabin", uses seawater to cool off their systems.

Almost every summer seasonal jellyfish get sucked into the system threatening to shut down the plant's turbines, but workers managed to clear the system and dispose the white creatures, the station chief engineer told Reuters.


The jellyfish are disposed of at a waste facility supervised by Israel's Ministry of Environmental Protection, the power plant's chief engineer said.

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