Clore Scholarships help fight brain drain of researchers

Of 219 Clore Scholarship recipients from 1992 to 2012, more than 20 are still in postdoc research positions abroad, while 67% are now teaching and doing research at Israeli universities.

By
November 7, 2016 00:12
1 minute read.
A scientist prepares protein samples for analysis in a lab

A scientist prepares protein samples for analysis in a lab at the Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton. (photo credit: REUTERS)

The Clore Israel Foundation will award 10 scholarships to researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University and the Technion- Israel Institute of Technology on November 14 under its Clore Scholars Program, which, since 1991, has provided 251 scholarships to promote the research of outstanding young Israeli scientists.

This year’s recipients are Yariv Aizenbud of TAU (mathematics); Rand Arafeh of Weizmann (molecular cell biology); Yishai Avior of HU (genetics); Shai Evra of HU (mathematics); Ron Feinder of TAU (molecular microbiology and biotechnology); Amir Giladi of Weizmann (immunology); Leah Houri- Ze’evi of TAU (neurobiology); Guy Salomon of the Technion (mathematics); Gregory Spektor of the Technion (electrical engineering); and Roni Werman of HU (biochemistry and genetics).

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Each will receive a three-year scholarship (currently set at $27,000 per year), a personal award and an allowance for research-related expenses.

Most of the Clore Scholars, who pursue careers in scientific fields, including mathematics, physics, chemistry, life sciences, earth sciences, computer science, agriculture, engineering and technology, continue with a post-doctoral period in universities and institutions abroad and then return to Israel.

Of 219 Clore Scholarship recipients from 1992 to 2012, more than 20 are still in postdoc research positions abroad, while 67% are now teaching and doing research at Israeli universities and hi-tech companies throughout the country.

The award ceremony will be held at 4 p.m. in the Belfer Building of the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot. Prof. Rotem Sorek of Weizmann’s Department of Molecular Genetics, who was himself a 2004 Clore Scholarship recipient, will be the keynote speaker.


Related Content

A service Robot
April 26, 2018
Playing tic-tac-toe with social robot can help rehabilitate disabled

By JUDY SIEGEL

Israel Weather
  • 15 - 23
    Beer Sheva
    17 - 21
    Tel Aviv - Yafo
  • 12 - 18
    Jerusalem
    15 - 21
    Haifa
  • 19 - 27
    Elat
    16 - 27
    Tiberias