Israeli employment bump expected for High Holy Days

According to the Federation of Israeli Chambers of Commerce, a business group, the High Holy Days will create 6,400 jobs, equivalent to a 1.4% increase in jobs.

By
September 13, 2016 16:29
1 minute read.
View of the Azrieli Towers in Tel Aviv.

View of the Azrieli Towers in Tel Aviv.. (photo credit: REUTERS)

For many Israelis, the high holidays in the autumn are a welcome break, an opportunity to enjoy long weekends, days off of work and trips without using up precious vacation days.

But for some, it’s a chance to jump into the workforce.

According to the Federation of Israeli Chambers of Commerce, a business group, the high holidays will create 6,400 jobs, equivalent to a 1.4% increase in employment. The jobs, which are mostly concentrated in the retail, tourist and restaurant service industries, tend to attract students and temporary workers.

Over the past eight years, for example, services including hotels, restaurants, cafes, pubs, kiosks, banquet halls and catering services recorded a 1.5% average increase in jobs during the holiday season.

In retail, jobs increased about 1.4% on average, with the greatest number of new positions being created in department stores, which accounts for 36% of the seasonal retail jobs, and footwear, which accounts for 20%.

FICC director of labor relations Sigal Sudai warned that these kinds of workers may be vulnerable to exploitation.

“Employees’ rights during the holidays always create uncertainty and confusion among employers and employees alike,” she said, urging both businesses and new employees to familiarize themselves with the laws and collective labor agreements.

But don’t expect the bump to show up in the already impressive labor-market statistics such as the unemployment rate. The reported figures are adjusted to account for regular seasonal changes.


Related Content

Workers strike outside of the Teva building in Jerusalem, December 2017
December 18, 2017
Workers make explosive threats as massive Teva layoff strikes continue

By MAX SCHINDLER