Brewery producing craft beer made from Boston river water taps Israeli tech

Desalitech – founded in Israel 7 years ago and since moved to Boston – is using its patented technology to provide water for Harpoon’s Charles River Pale Ale.

By JTA
October 3, 2015 08:10
1 minute read.
boston

The Charles River in front of the Boston skyline. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

BOSTON — An Israeli-founded water purification company has teamed up with Boston-based Harpoon Brewery to channel the once-famously polluted Charles River into a new beer.

Desalitech – which started in Israel seven years ago and then moved to Boston – is using its patented technology to provide water for Harpoon’s Charles River Pale Ale. The limited-edition beer is on tap this week at Boston’s HUBweek, a week-long science and art festival.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Desalitech president Nadav Efraty said helping to produce the beer is part of his company’s mission to better the environment.

“Water scarcity is a global challenge that affects millions across the world – we are proud to be a Massachusetts company that is providing solutions and making an impact here in the US and beyond,” he said in a statement.

Desalitech uses a closed-circuit reverse osmosis system developed over decades in Israel by Efraty’s American-born father, Avi Efraty, a chemist, who moved his family to Israel in the mid-1970s. The elder Efraty serves as the company’s chief technical officer.

In 2013, Desalitech established its world headquarters in Greater Boston, attracted the region by former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, who led several high-profile trade missions to Israel.

Once heavily polluted, the 80-mile-long Charles River achieved fame thanks to the Standells 1960s rock hit “Dirty Water.” The song has been recorded and performed by everyone from Bruce Springsteen to the Dropkick Murphys and is a favorite of Boston sports teams.

JPOST VIDEOS THAT MIGHT INTEREST YOU:


Over the decades, the river, which separates Boston from Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been cleaned up considerably — with some of its previously most polluted portions now open to swimming.

Desalitech approached Harpoon in September about a collaboration. The offbeat idea appealed to Harpoon president Charlie Storey who said in interviews that he remembers growing up in Boston hearing that if he ever fell into the Charles River, he’d need to get to an emergency room.

“Harpoon is proud to call Boston our home and to do our part to build a stronger, more sustainable environment and community,” Storey said in a statement. Harpoon, an employee-owned company established in 1986, is now the 15th largest craft brewer in the United States.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Workers strike outside of the Teva building in Jerusalem, December 2017
December 18, 2017
Workers make explosive threats as massive Teva layoff strikes continue

By MAX SCHINDLER