Unemployment rises 0.5% in September

Unemployment rises 0.5%

By SHARON WROBEL
November 9, 2009 03:05
2 minute read.

 
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The pace of the rise in the unemployment rate slowed in September as the number of those fired rose by 0.5 percent in trend figures bringing the total number to 216,000 compared with an average growth rate of 1.9% in the months August last year to June, the Israel National Employment Service (NES) reported on Sunday. "An analysis of the data of newly unemployed and jobseeker numbers in September shows that the rate of expansion is continuing to slow," said Yossi Farhi, Director of the NES. "The NES continued to actively find job placements for jobseekers ranging from sales and services placements to skilled industrial placements as well as for academics, clerical staff and technicians. In September, the number of job placements reached a high of 14,733 representing a rise of 5.5% from the 14,000 jobseekers placed in August." During the month of September, 226,500 jobseekers were registered at the NES down from 236,000 in the previous month. Still, seasonally adjusted figures excluding holidays showed that the number of jobseekers surged by 2.9% during the month of September to 236,400 from 229,700 in August. Farhi added that 40% of all jobseekers were coming from Arabic settlements and developing small towns. In total 15,716 workers were laid off in September compared with 15,210 employees a month earlier and 15,126 during the same month last year. Gender analysis found that the majority or 55% of those losing their jobs were women and 45% men. Out of the total number of layoffs, nearly half or 6,093 of the workers being made unemployed in September were in the age group of 25 to 34 years old. At the same time, though, there were little signs of improvement in the number of long-term unemployed. Out of the total number of jobseekers in September, 33.3% or 75,480 were registered as unemployed for more than 270 days over the last 12 months, compared with 32.4% in the previous month. During the month of September, the requests for workers fell 6.2% to 24,000 from a record of of 25,300 in August. However in comparison with the same month last year the demand for workers rose by 1.8%. The greatest demand for workers was for skilled workers in industrial and construction sectors followed by sales and services personnel, technicians and clerical staff. Based on statistics for September, the national rate of unemployment is 7%, the NES reported. The highest rate of unemployment, 11.3%, was in the South, followed by the North, at 10.6%. The lowest unemployment rates were in Jerusalem and the Dan region with 4.1%. In the center of the country the rate of unemployment reached 6.6%.

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