101-year-old Holocaust survivor Julius Nadel dies

Nadel was a passionate Zionist and was honored by the Defense Ministry in 1976 as a “Fighter for the State of Israel.”

The funeral of 101-year-old Holocaust survivor Julius Nadel in Sydney, Australia. (photo credit: Courtesy)
The funeral of 101-year-old Holocaust survivor Julius Nadel in Sydney, Australia.
(photo credit: Courtesy)
Holocaust survivor Julius Nadel passed away on January 30 at the age of 101.
His eulogy, written by long-time friend Robert Gescheit and delivered by Rabbi Motti Feldman at Sydney's Chevra Kadisha, was published by the news site Jwire.
Nadel, born Yulek Nadel in Krakow, Poland, on June 8, 1918, grew up in the Jewish section of the city. His father was a professional officer in the Polish army, eventually inspiring him to report for service in the Polish army at age 17.
Soon after the start of the war, Nadel was taken prisoner by the German army, but he managed to escape and found safety with the Polish underground, of which he was the only Jewish volunteer. At the end of 1942, he was again captured by the Germans and sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp before being sent to a camp in Gusen.
He was liberated by American paratroopers in 1944. Unfortunately, his mother and older sister did not survive.
During and after the war, Nadel underwent CIA training in Frankfurt, Germany, and participated in many secret operations all across Europe for the American army.
All the while, Nadel possessed a love for Israel and dreamed of the establishment of the Jewish state.
Nadel was a Zionist and was a part of the Betar youth movement since childhood. Later on, he became involved with an organization known as Irgun Tzva Leumi, which worked to organize Jewish Holocaust survivors dedicated to establishing a Jewish state. He also helped in weapon training for young survivors in displaced persons’ camps to prepare them for the defense of the future State of Israel.
In 1949, Nadel relocated to Sydney, Australia. There, he met his wife, a fellow Polish refugee, with whom he had three daughters. These daughters then gave him eight grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.
During his time in Australia, Nadel worked in property development and continued to support the Jewish community. He was recruited by the heads of the Sydney Jewish community to assist with security matters in the community.
He was a member of the New South Wales Jewish Board of Deputies, the liaison between the Board of Deputies and the Australian Federal Police, and coordinated security protocols for many years for visiting Israeli government officials, like General Moshe Dayan.
He was also an active participant on many boards, including the New South Wales Association of Ex-Servicemen, the Jewish War Memorial organization, the UIA, the JCA and the COA.
He was honored by the Defense Ministry in 1976 as a “Fighter for the State of Israel,” and was given the “Irgun Etzel Award.”
 Holocaust survivor Julius Nadel shows his medals. (Credit: Courtesy) Holocaust survivor Julius Nadel shows his medals. (Credit: Courtesy)
“Julius was a larger-than-life character. He knew how to work hard, play hard, and enjoy life. He did not mince words. When he spoke, you listened. If you were smart, you would internalize what he said to you, because foremost he was a teacher; a teacher with a wealth of experience, knowledge and a genuine desire to help you to get where you wanted to go, or where he believed you should be going,” the eulogy stated.
Nadel’s love for Israel never ended. Before passing, he gave Gescheit an Israeli flag and an Israeli officer’s cap to be placed on his grave when he passed away. His request was honored, and the flag and cap have been placed on his coffin.