Alyssa Milano shows Farrakhan who's the boss, won't speak at women's rally

“Any time that there is any bigotry or antisemitism in that respect, it needs to be called out and addressed."

By JTA
November 8, 2018 12:23
1 minute read.
Alyssa Milano shows Farrakhan who's the boss, won't speak at women's rally

Actor Alyssa Milano makes remarks as Attorney Michael Avenatti listens, at a protest outside the White House in Washington, July 17, 2018. (photo credit: MARY F. CALVERT / REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Actress and activist Alyssa Milano said she won’t speak at the next Women’s March if it is organized by two current leaders who will not condemn antisemite Louis Farrakhan.

In an interview with The Advocate published last week, Milano criticized Tamika Mallory and Linda Sarsour for not distancing themselves from the Nation of Islam leader, who has repeatedly made antisemitic, homophobic and transphobic comments.

“Any time that there is any bigotry or antisemitism in that respect, it needs to be called out and addressed. I’m disappointed in the leadership of the Women’s March that they haven’t done it adequately,” Milano said.

Earlier this year, Mallory was criticized for not speaking out after she attended an event during which Farrakhan said, “the powerful Jews are my enemy.”

Sarsour later defended Mallory from criticism.

“I will not sit back while a strong, bold, unapologetic, committed black woman who risks her life every day to speak truth to power and organize and mobilize movements is questioned, berated and abused,” Sarsour wrote on Facebook. “I stand with Tamika Mallory every day, with every fiber of my being because she has so much of what we need in the movement right now to win.”

In The Advocate interview, Milano said that she would not feel comfortable speaking at the march.

“I would say no at this point,” she said. “Unfortunate that none of them have come forward against him at this point. Or even given a really good reason why to support them.”

Last year, Milano’s tweet urging women to share their experiences of sexual harassment and assault propelled the #MeToo movement into the mainstream. (Activist Tarana Burke had coined the term in 2006.) Milano spoke at last year’s Women’s March in Washington, DC.

Farrakhan has a history of making bigoted statements. Last month, he was widely criticized, including by Chelsea Clinton, for comparing Jews to termites in a tweet. 

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

A woman bows her head in front of a memorial on October 28, 2018, at the Tree of Life synagogue
November 20, 2018
Pennsylvania churchgoers don kippot in solidarity after Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

By ROGER DUPUIS/THE TIMES-LEADER