Blair Braverman second Jewish woman to complete Iditarod

Set in Alaska, the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race from Anchorage to Nome.

Matt Hall gets his team ready at the ceremonial start of the Iditarod dog sled race in Anchorage, Alaska, U.S., March 2, 2019.  (photo credit: KERRY TASKER / REUTERS)
Matt Hall gets his team ready at the ceremonial start of the Iditarod dog sled race in Anchorage, Alaska, U.S., March 2, 2019.
(photo credit: KERRY TASKER / REUTERS)
Jewish-American writer, adventurer, and sled-dog racer Blair Braverman is the second Jewish woman to complete the intense Iditarod race on Sunday.
She reached the 36th place in a little over 13 days, JTA reported.
The Iditarod race is the biggest one in its field and is roughly 1,150 miles (1,850 km) long.
Those who attempt it must show excellent skills in navigation and handling the dogs as well as be able to withstand the intense weather conditions of the wilderness.
The winner was Pete Kaiser of of Bethel, Alaska, Reuters reported. 
Braverman, who wrote the 2016 non-fiction book Welcome to the Goddman ice-cube about her experience learning how to be a musher in Norway and Alaska, currently runs a school for the sport with her husband in Alaska.
She is openly Jewish and often writes about the experience of being one of the few Jewish persons in the part of Alaska she now resides in.
In their original story, JTA mistakenly reported Braverman was the first Jewish woman to finish the race. That honor belongs to Susan Cantor, who completed the race in 1992.


Tags Alaska