First Orthodox Jewish police officer hired in Lakewood N.J.

The Orthodox Jewish officer is one of 13 new officers who were hired, a diverse group who will serve the rapidly growing Lakewood community.

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February 28, 2019 07:40
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A police car blocks access to the scene of a mass shooting at the Cameo Nightlife club in Cincinatti, Ohio, US March 26, 2017.. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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The first Orthodox Jewish police officer in the history of the Lakewood New Jersey Police Department was hired this week, according to The Lakewood Scoop (TLS).

The Orthodox Jewish officer is one of 13 new officers who were hired, a diverse group who will serve the rapidly growing Lakewood community.

“I am pleased to announce today that we’re hiring 13 new police officers, men and women from our very diverse community in order to bring our numbers up to 150 sworn officers,” Police Chief Greg Meyer told TLS in an interview.

The officers still have to complete police academy before they begin serving the community in approximately six months. Their names will not be announced until they officially begin their positions and hit the streets.

“At that time, they’ll graduate, and if they all make it through, we’ll be announcing them to the public, you’ll get to see their faces, and hear a little more about their stories,” Chief Meyer said.

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