Nazi-hunting couple wins top German award

The Klarsfelds created a database of deported Jewish children and won fame in the 1970s for helping to locate former Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie, known as the "Butcher of Lyon."

By REUTERS
July 20, 2015 17:50
1 minute read.

Nazi-hunting couple wins top German award

Nazi-hunting couple wins top German award

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Germany on Monday awarded husband-and-wife Nazi-hunters Beate and Serge Klarsfeld its highest distinction, the Order of Merit, for four decades of work bringing war criminals to justice.

The Klarsfelds created a database of deported Jewish children and won fame in the 1970s for helping to locate former Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie, known as the "Butcher of Lyon" for torturing and executing prisoners in France.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


In 1968 Beate Klarsfeld famously received a one-year prison, later reduced, for slapping then-Chancellor Kurt Kiesinger in a confrontation over his war-time role in the Nazi propaganda effort.

"This recognition by Germany is gratifying," she told Reuters after the ceremony at the residence of the German ambassador to France in the presence of friends of the family and fellow workers on Holocaust memory projects.

German-born Beate Klarsfeld said she had been largely oblivious to her country's World War Two crimes before she moved to France in the 1960 and met Serge, a Romanian Jew whose father had been killed in Auschwitz.

Accepting the award, Serge Klarsfeld said the spirit of their work had always been "in search of justice for the victims and never out of revenge".

German ambassador to France Susanne Wasum-Rainer thanked the couple for their contribution to "rehabilitating the image of Germany".


Related Content

The Drohobych Choral Synagogue, which has been revived through the efforts of a Russian businessman
July 18, 2018
Begin’s marriage synagogue in Ukraine renovated

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF