Pittsburgh, coping with pain, buries three more synagogue massacre victims

Funerals were to be held on Wednesday for Melvin Wax, Irving Younger and Joyce Fienberg

By REUTERS
October 31, 2018 17:24
3 minute read.
A man prays at a makeshift memorial outside the Tree of Life synagogue

A man prays at a makeshift memorial outside the Tree of Life synagogue following Saturday's shooting at the synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S., October 31, 2018. (photo credit: CATHAL MCNAUGHTON/REUTERS)

 
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PITTSBURGH —  Pittsburgh prepared to hold three more funerals on Wednesday for Jewish victims of a shooting rampage at a synagogue that has become the focus of a fierce political debate about white nationalism and antisemitism ahead of hotly contested US congressional elections next week.

Eleven worshipers were gunned down on Saturday morning by a man who stormed into the Tree of Life Synagogue and opened fire, yelling anti-Semitic statements including: "All Jews must die." It was believed to be the deadliest attack on Jews in the United States in recent history.

Funerals were to be held on Wednesday for Melvin Wax, 88, who was leading Sabbath services when the attack began; retired real estate agent Irving Younger, 69; and retired university researcher Joyce Fienberg, 75.

Mourners began showing up in gray, cool weather, hours before Fienberg's midmorning funeral at the Beth Shalom Synagogue as police blocked off surrounding streets.

The early crowd was lighter than the one for the Tuesday funeral of brothers Cecil and David Rosenthal, widely known and praised as "the helpers" at Tree of Life.

The aftermath of the tragedy still pervaded life in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood where the synagogue is located.

In coffee shops, customers talked about the victims they knew. In the street, friends embraced and comforted one another during the period of raw grief.

The synagogue attack has heightened a national debate over Republican US President Donald Trump's rhetoric, which critics say has contributed to a surge in white-nationalist and neo-Nazi activity. His administration denies he has encouraged far-right extremism and is instead attempting to unify America.

Amid the first funerals for victims on Tuesday, Trump visited Tree of Life.

Thousands protested his presence in the city, accusing him of using rhetoric that has fueled antisemitism in America.

Several thousand protesters, an ethnically mixed crowd of all ages, held an anti-Trump rally about a block away from the synagogue just as his visit began on Tuesday, singing Old Testament psalms and carrying signs with such slogans as: "We build bridges not walls."

Trump made no public comments during his visit, but wrote on Twitter on Wednesday morning that his office had been "shown great respect on a very sad and solemn day" in Pittsburgh.


"Small protest was not seen by us, staged far away," he tweeted. "The Fake News stories were just the opposite-Disgraceful!"

More than 1,800 people paid their respects on Tuesday at Rodef Shalom, another synagogue in Squirrel Hill, the heart of the city's Jewish community.

Trump's visit to Pennsylvania's second largest city came seven days before elections that will determine whether his Republican Party maintains control of both houses of Congress or whether the Democrats seize a majority in one chamber or both.

The accused gunman in the synagogue attack, Robert Bowers, was charged on Monday with 29 federal felony counts including hate crimes.

Four days after the attack, nerves in Squirrel Hill were still frayed. A public school was placed on lockdown following an unsubstantiated report that someone had brought a gun onto campus, police said

Jodi Smith, a Pittsburgh native, joined mourners ahead of the Wax funeral at the Ralph Schugar Chapel and remembered him as a "very polite, gentle man."

"I could have claimed him as a father," Smith said. "He was always at the synagogue, always helping out. The synagogue had been his life since his wife passed away a few years ago."

Fienberg spent 25 years as a researcher at the University of Pittsburgh's Learning Research and Development Center until she retired in 2008.

"She was an engaging, elegant, and warm person," the center said on Facebook.

Younger, whose funeral will also be held at Rodef Shalom, was remembered as a doting grandfather.

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