Rochelle Shoretz, Sharsheret founder and cancer advocate, is dead at 42

The organization provides health information and support services for Jewish women living with breast cancer or ovarian cancer, or who are at increased risk for those diseases.

By JTA
June 1, 2015 16:45
1 minute read.
Rochelle Shoretz, founder and executive director of Sharsheret

Rochelle Shoretz, founder and executive director of Sharsheret. (photo credit: SHARSHERET)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Rochelle Shoretz, whose own breast cancer diagnosis at age 28 led her to found the national cancer organization Sharsheret, died Sunday afternoon at her home in Teaneck, New Jersey. She was 42. The cause of death was complications from breast cancer. 

Shoretz founded Sharsheret in 2001, while undergoing chemotherapy. The organization provides health information and support services for Jewish women living with breast cancer or ovarian cancer, or who are at increased risk for those diseases.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Jewish women of Ashkenazi descent are at heightened risk for certain genetic mutations that can lead to cancer.

A graduate of Columbia Law School, Shoretz went on to clerk for United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She is thought to be the  first Orthodox Jewish woman to clerk for a Supreme Court justice.

“When I was diagnosed [in July 2001], there were a lot of offers to help with meals and transport my kids, but I really wanted to speak to another young mom who was going to have to explain to her kids that she was going to lose her hair to chemo,” Shoretz told JTA in 2003, of her decision to start Sharsheret.


The organization’s name is Hebrew for chain.

Shoretz beat her initial bout with the disease. But in 2009, the cancer returned, and it had spread. No longer curable, it was treatable — and friends say her energy and resolve were boundless until the end.

Shoretz is survived by two teenage sons, Shlomo and Dovid Mirsky; her mother, Sherry Tenenbaum; her father, Morris Shoretz;  five sisters, and two brothers. She was a stepdaughter of Jeffrey Tenenbaum and Carol Ann Finkelstein.

A funeral and interment will be held Monday in New Jersey.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

December 13, 2018
Natalie Portman: Israel's Nation State Law is a mistake and 'racist'

By AMY SPIRO