Stores on hotel grounds in Moscow allegedly caught selling anti-Semitic items

One of the offending items is a set of Russian nesting dolls painted with stereotypes of orthodox Jews

By
May 24, 2015 18:02
1 minute read.
Nazi

Russian nesting dolls painted with anti-Semitic stereotypes of Jews found in a Moscow hotel gift shop.. (photo credit: SIMON WIESENTHAL CENTRE)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Legal action is being urged after a number of gift stores on the premises of international chain hotels in Moscow were allegedly caught selling anti-Semitic and Nazi-themed items in its gift shop.

The two stores in question allegedly leased the spaces and ran the enterprises independently from the hotel operations.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


In a letter to Russian Prosecutor-General Yuri Yakovlev Chaika, the Simon Wiesenthal Center urged legal action to be taken against the items' producers and distributors.

Earlier this month, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a federal law banning Nazi imagery.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center's Director for International Relations, Dr. Shimon Samuels, was the one who spotted the shocking items while in Moscow for a conference celebrating the end of the Second World War, called 'The Lessons of Victory in the Second World War/The Great Patriotic War - Seventy Years Later.' The letter notes that the items are targeted to tourists and some even cost 27,000 rubles ($590 or NIS 2,317).

One of the items he saw for sale was a Russian nesting "matryoshka" doll, painted with anti-Semitic stereotypes of orthodox Jews with big noses and peyot.

The shock continued as he and colleagues also saw a chess set featuring Nazi Whermacht army figurines led by an Adolph Hiler figurine pitted against Red Army figurines led by a Joseph Stalin figurine.





Samuels noted that not far from both of these shocking displays was a Russian veteran victory ribbon.

"Born in London, I have always acknowledged the role of the Red Army on the Eastern Front in preventing a Nazi invasion of Great Britain," Samuels wrote in his statement. "Thereby, your people's sacrifice contributed to the survival of British Jews from destruction in the Holocaust – only 50 kilometers away on the European continent."

The center called the sale of these items "an insult to every Allied veteran and victim of World War II and also to the Russian tradition of chess excellence," and recommended that all the items immediately be confiscated.

Related Content

ISRAELI PLAYERS celebrate on the bench in the closing minutes of the blue-and-white’s 80-66 victory
July 22, 2018
Israel takes title at FIBA Under-20 Euros

By JERUSALEM POST SPORTS STAFF