What a Gallup poll and Egypt have in common

Both suggest that an increased investment in public diplomacy might eventually pay dividends.

By
July 28, 2014 15:13
Abdul Fattah al-Sisi

Egypt's President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi looks on as he delivers a speech in Cairo.. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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It often feels as if Israel can never win the public diplomacy war. After all, how do you compete with hundreds of dead Palestinians, other than through the one thing Israel will always do its utmost to prevent – even more dead Israelis? But while there’s no easy solution, two developments of the current war in Gaza offer hope that over time, this uphill battle can be won.

The first is a fascinating Gallup poll published last week on how Americans view the Hamas-Israel conflict. Unsurprisingly, most respondents deemed Hamas’s actions unjustified (70% to 11%). But they split almost evenly over Israel’s actions, with 42% considering them justified and 39% unjustified. At first glance, that doesn’t seem encouraging. But Gallup’s breakdown of the results is illuminating.

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