Technion scientists discover new 'antibiotic cocktails'

Researchers at the Faculties of Biology and Computer Science at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa have engineered a new drug that combines several different strains of antibiotics.

By
January 24, 2019 08:47
1 minute read.
Prof. Roy Kishony of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa

Prof. Roy Kishony of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. (photo credit: TECHNION)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

What scientists say is an innovative way of treating disease - the "antibiotic cocktail," a mix of several different antibiotic strains - may prove hopeful after trial runs.

Researchers at the Faculties of Biology and Computer Science at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa have engineered a new drug that combines several different strains of antibiotics.

This experiment was supported by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Israeli Centers for Research Excellence (I-CORE) and the European Research Council (ERC). Prof. Roy Kishony and doctoral student Dor Russ of the Technion worked on the study, and found that the efficiency of an "antibiotic cocktail" is dependent on how many types of strains it is made up of as well as the dosage of the combined strain.

Researchers have been constantly testing new strains of antibiotics due to the fear that one day bacteria will become completely antibiotic resistant.


Kishony's team was able to estimate the current level of bacteria resistance as well as predict the resistance it may develop in the future. This data can be used to find the most effective antibiotic combination, allowing these treatments to be individualized per patient. When the number of strains increases, the total dosage does too, but can be decreased without effecting the combined cocktails' efficiency. The group tested their theory by analyzing several different combinations.

Many species of microbes are able to coexist in high proximity and are exposed to varying degrees of stress in nature . Antibiotic cocktails, such as the ones tested by Kishony's team, work to curb side effects and fight current resistances to antibiotics. This study was eye-opening as it proved how cells may be affected by numerous stresses to their systems, and evaluated how combined versions of some antibiotic strains were able to fight several types of diseases.

Antibiotics, a type of molecule procured from microorganisms that can kill bacteria, and found naturally in fungi and yeast,
were a groundbreaking discovery in the history of medicine. The first antibiotic, penicillin, was discovered by Sir Howard Fleming in 1928.  Today, multiple synthetic strains of antibiotics have been engineered in laboratories to treat different diseases.

Related Content

June 16, 2019
Is Paleo-diet real? Archeologists scoop up ancient feces to find out

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF

Cookie Settings