Chavez protege narrowly wins Venezuela election

Opposition says results are too close to call after former bus driver Nicolas Maduro becomes Venezuela's latest president.

By REUTERS
April 15, 2013 09:07
1 minute read.
Venezuelan president elect Nicolas Maduro

Nicolas Maduro 370. (photo credit: REUTERS/Tomas Bravo)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

CARACAS - Nicolas Maduro, a former bus driver who became Hugo Chavez's protege, was declared the winner of Venezuela's presidential election on Sunday but the opposition refused to accept the result and demanded a recount of all the votes.

Opposition candidate Henrique Capriles said he did not recognize the official results that gave Maduro 50.7 percent support versus 49.1 percent for him, a difference of just 235,000 ballots.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"Mr. Maduro, if you were illegitimate before, now you are even more loaded with illegitimacy," Capriles said, adding that his team had identified more than 3,000 "incidents" during the voting.

Capriles' refusal to accept the result raised fears of political unrest in Venezuela, an OPEC nation with the world's biggest oil reserves.

The National Electoral Council earlier said that more than 99 percent of votes had been counted and that Maduro's victory was "irreversible."

Government supporters immediately gathered to celebrate outside the Miraflores presidential palace, where Maduro paid an emotional tribute to Chavez, the socialist leader who named him as his successor in his last speech to the nation before dying last month from cancer.

"The fight continues!" Maduro, 50, told the victory rally.



"This was the first time without the giant candidate, but he left behind his 'son,' who is now going to be president and is going to show he is worthy of the fatherland."

Some opposition supporters in Caracas banged pots and pans in protest as Maduro spoke.

Related Content

Angela Merkel
August 21, 2018
More refugees find jobs in Germany, integration going 'pretty well'

By REUTERS