Children's book based on Holocaust story is pulled

By
December 30, 2008 16:14
1 minute read.

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

A children's book inspired by a since-discredited Holocaust story has been pulled by the publisher. Laurie Friedman's "Angel Girl," based on Herman Rosenblat's tale of meeting his future wife at a concentration camp, had been released in the fall in the United States by the Lerner Publishing Group. Rosenblat, 79, acknowledged last weekend that he didn't meet his wife during the war. His own memoir, "Angel at the Fence," scheduled for release in February, was quickly canceled by Berkley Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA). Adam Lerner, president and publisher of the Minneapolis-based Lerner Publishing Group, said in a statement Tuesday that the company had been misled by the Rosenblats. "We are dismayed to learn about Herman and Roma Rosenblat's recantation of part of their Holocaust survival story," Lerner said. "While this tragic event in world history needs to be taught to children, it is imperative that it is done so in a factual way that doesn't sacrifice veracity for emotional impact." Friedman said in a statement that the Rosenblats had reviewed her manuscript and assured her of its accuracy. "I wanted to find a way to share what I felt was an important and inspiring message for children," Friedman said. "My goal in writing `Angel Girl' was to communicate that even in the darkest of times, no one should give up hope. Unfortunately, I, like many others, am disappointed and upset to now learn of Herman's fabrications," she added.

Related Content

ireland
July 17, 2018
What Ireland's Boycott Bill Means For Israel

By CHARLES BYBELEZER/THE MEDIA LINE