Facebook to crack down on anti-vaccine groups

The company said it would reduce the ranking of groups and pages that spread misinformation about vaccinations in its News Feed and Search features.

By REUTERS
March 8, 2019 02:28
1 minute read.
vaccine syringe

Vaccine syringe. (photo credit: INGIMAGE)

 
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March 7 (Reuters) - Facebook Inc said it would crack down on misinformation about vaccines, by reducing its distribution and providing users with more authoritative information on the topic.

The company said it would reduce the ranking of groups and pages that spread misinformation about vaccinations in its News Feed and Search features and would also reject ads spreading such information.

Facebook, Twitter Inc and Alphabet Inc have been under pressure from regulators around the globe to fight the spread of misinformation aimed at destabilizing elections by stoking hardline positions or supporting propaganda campaigns.

Facebook said on Thursday it had removed 137 fake pages, groups and Instagram accounts in the United Kingdom and a further 31 in Romania for engaging in hate speech and making divisive comments.

Earlier on Thursday, Nathaniel Gleicher, head of Facebook's cybersecurity policy, wrote  in a blog post that the individuals behind the fake pages, groups and accounts represented themselves as far-right and anti-far-right activists in the UK,

Some of the most popular pages that were taken down defended the role of migrants and Muslims in Britain, and highlighted hostile content related to Tommy Robinson, the former leader of far-right extremist group English Defense League, according to a blog https://medium.com/dfrlab/exclusive-facebook-takes-down-fake-network-in-the-united-kingdom-58350e0f3401 by Digital Forensic Research (DFR) Lab.


DFR, a small online forensics team of Washington-based Atlantic Council thinktank, has been working with Facebook to enhance the social network's investigations of foreign interference.

Last month, Facebook removed hundreds of Indonesian accounts, pages and groups from its network after discovering they were linked to an online group accused of spreading hate speech and fake news.

Facebook said on Thursday the people behind the fake accounts frequently posted about local and political news including topics like immigration, free speech, racism, LGBT issues, far-right politics, issues between India and Pakistan, and religious beliefs including Islam and Christianity.

About 175,000 accounts followed one or more of these pages, and around 4,500 accounts followed one or more of these Instagram accounts.

In Romania, the page admins and account owners typically posted about political issues, including partisan news under fictitious bylines in support of the Social Democratic Party (PSD), Gleicher said.

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