'ISIS could use chemical, biological weapons against France'

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told parliament that risk of non-conventional weapons exists.

By REUTERS
November 19, 2015 11:31
1 minute read.

French Prime Minister says chemical warfare risk can't be ruled out

French Prime Minister says chemical warfare risk can't be ruled out

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

France could face the risk of chemical or bacterial warfare in its fight against Islamist militants, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls said on Thursday.

"We must not rule anything out. I say it with all the precautions needed. But we know and bear in mind that there is also a risk of chemical or bacteriological weapons," Valls told parliament.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"The macabre imagination of the masterminds is limitless," he said in a speech in the lower house of parliament meant to gain approval for an extension of the state of emergency.

The head of Europol, the coordinating organization of EU countries' police forces, said on Thursday that Europe is likely to face new Islamic State attacks after those in Paris on Friday.

"It is reasonable to assume ... that further attacks are likely," Europol director Rob Wainwright told lawmakers in a hearing in the European Parliament in Brussels.

He compared Friday's events in Paris to those in Mumbai in 2008, when militants killed 166 people at different locations across the Indian city.

"The reality of what happened in Mumbai then has now arrived in Europe," Wainwright said.



"This is clearly therefore a more significant and threatening form of terrorism than the phenomenon of the lone actor," he added, referring to attacks over recent years by individuals or small groups inspired by Islamic State.

"It's also a clear statement of intent by ISIS (Islamic State) to export its brutal brand of terrorism to Europe to take it more onto the international stage."

Noting other attacks including last month's downing of a Russian airliner in Egypt, he added: "We are dealing with a very serious, well resourced, determined international terrorist organization that is now active on the streets of Europe. This represents the most serious terrorist threat faced in Europe for 10 years."

The hearing comes on the eve of an extraordinary meeting of EU interior and justice ministers to discuss measures after the attacks in Paris.

Related Content

Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei
July 21, 2018
Khamenei backs blocking Gulf oil exports if Iranian sales stopped

By REUTERS